Field Notes: Mid-June Radishes and Berries

Field Notes: Mid-June Radishes and Berries

The soil in the fields has been through so many changes already this year. It has been pounded and compacted by torrential downpours in early spring and then dried to a hard-as-a-brick state after a few weeks of really dry, hot days. This constricted the root development of a lot of crops, which, unfortunately, leads to a poor yield when the roots of crops like radishes are what you are looking to reap.

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{name} Posted by Erin McKinney on 06/16, 2011 at 02:38 PM

Tags: fieldnotes |

Moser’s Garden Produce from Centre Hall

Moser’s Garden Produce from Centre Hall

Moser’s Garden in Centre Hall is a family operation. It began in 1976 as a half-acre garden with a few dozen fruit trees and grape vines. Today it has grown in both variety and acreage producing over 150 varieties of tomatoes, as well as berries, peppers, and sweet corn.

Watch a video interview with Barry Moser and find his produce at the State College Farmers Market on Tuesdays and Fridays and at the North Atherton Market on Saturdays.

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{name} Posted by Katherine Taylor Grofic on 06/15, 2011 at 03:23 PM

Tags: video | farm | market |

Wet Spring Impacts Farmers

Wet Spring Impacts Farmers

This year’s wet spring not only dampened your home gardening plans, it put farmers way behind schedule, too. Find out how this may impact yields and food prices in an audio interview with James Dunn, Penn State professor of agricultural economics.

Hear the interview conducted by WPSU’s Patty Satalia.

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{name} Posted by Emily Wiley on 06/14, 2011 at 01:39 PM

Tags: farm |

Unpaid Field Hand: Welcome to the Farm

Unpaid Field Hand: Welcome to the Farm

Can you identify what vegetable growing is pictured? No, really, look carefully and give it try.

Why even ask, you might ask? Because much of the knowledge our grandparents had about the variety names of fruits and vegetables and how they grew has been lost, and I think that is too bad. They knew the names of many apple and tomato varieties, for example, and what each was good for. Part of our renewed interest in what we eat as we embark on a local food journey should involve regaining this knowledge. 

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{name} Posted by James Eisenstein on 06/10, 2011 at 01:35 PM

Tags: fieldhand |

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