All Posts including “farming”

I’m Fed Up With Industrial Food

I am really fed up. And it isn’t just because I am an increasingly irascible, old curmudgeon.

I’m fed up with the behavior of government agencies like the FDA, the USDA, and the EPA, dancing like puppets in the hands of Monsanto, ConAgra, Dow, Big Pharma and their ilk. The FDA dilly-dallies by continuing to allow antibiotics in animal feed to promote “efficiency” and profits, when it is clear that the practice promotes the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that threaten our health.

I’m fed up with the EPA constantly approving new pesticides that are known to kill pollinators. (Who needs insects anyway?)

Continue Reading: I’m Fed Up With Industrial Food

{name} Posted by James Eisenstein on 05/27, 2014 at 09:52 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: supermarket | corn | opinion | factoryfarming |

PASA conference is basically “a huge family reunion” for local food community

For twenty-three years, the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, otherwise known as PASA, has been gathering for its very own Farming for the Future Conference. Last week vendors from all over the country congregated at the Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center to attend workshops, participate in auctions, listen to guest speakers, receive awards, and to simply share their appreciation of farming as a whole.

Lauren Smith, director of development for PASA, says her favorite aspect of the annual conference is that it’s like “a huge family reunion.” Indeed, the majority of farmers and businesses in attendance have previously come to the conference, so many of them are familiar with one another. Lauren explains, “We have an amazing community of farmers. They become a network of ideas and inspiration.”

Continue Reading: PASA conference is basically “a huge family reunion” for local food community

{name} Posted by Jordan Reabold on 02/10, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: PASA | FarmingfortheFuture |

Farmers Get Down to Business

Food Entrepreneurs Will Find Wealth of Resources at Annual PASA Conference

Farmers and other food entrepreneurs are set to acquire tools for success at the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture’s (PASA) 23rd Annual Farming for the Future Conference, Feb. 5-8 at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel in State College, PA.

On Feb. 6, PASA hosts “Raising Dough: Financing Your Food Based Business,” an intensive, day long track aimed at farmers looking to amass capital for farm-based businesses.

Continue Reading: Farmers Get Down to Business

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 01/30, 2014 at 10:14 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: PASA | FarmingfortheFuture | conference | entrepreneur |

Sustainable Ag Community to Reflect, Rally at Premier Gathering

The following is a press release for the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture’s 23rd Farming for the Future Conference. Look for more about this event on Local Food Journey in the next several weeks, as this is a major happening for our local food community…

MILLHEIM, PA January 6, 2014 – The Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) hosts the 23rd Annual Farming for the Future Conference next month, February 5-8 at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel in State College, PA. Farmers, foodies, artisans, activists and other members of the sustainable agriculture community will gather around the theme “Letting Nature Lead” as the debate over the future of agriculture continues to garner widespread attention, from dinner tables to the halls of Congress.

Continue Reading: Sustainable Ag Community to Reflect, Rally at Premier Gathering

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 01/23, 2014 at 10:15 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: PASA | conference | FarmingfortheFuture |

Greenhouse Woes

The frost hit hard last week, which did a few crops in, but made others perk up a bit. Anything in the cabbage family just got sweeter.

Continue Reading: Greenhouse Woes

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 10/17, 2012 at 07:59 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

Real Life on the Farm

Last night I attended a Local Harvest banquet put on by the Student Food Initiative at Juniata College where we feasted on the bounty of many of our local farms including our own. The students also invited me along with other farmers to talk about farming. Of course I lied out of my teeth because I didn’t want to dampen the enthusiasm these folks have for the idyllic life style which they believe we lead. 

We really need young people to get involved in farming if we want to continue enjoying fresh local food. A little deception is necessary to keep the tradition going, so I avoided talking about the first 15 years on the farm.

Continue Reading: Real Life on the Farm

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 10/07, 2012 at 08:06 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

It’s the Busiest Time of the Year

It’s official. The “we’ve crossed the threshold of the autumn equinox and stepped into what should be a leisurely stroll towards winter.”

Most people think this is the end of the growing season, but for farmers, it’s really the busiest time of year.

Continue Reading: It’s the Busiest Time of the Year

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 09/26, 2012 at 08:13 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

Potato Patch

It’s hard to keep focused on a farm in the middle of August. Most people think of it as the beginning of harvest time, with smooth sailing into bucolic fall days as we stuff our coolers, barns and root cellars with nature’s bounty.

In reality it’s always harvest time on a vegetable farm and August poses a special challenge because after months of ceaseless activity fueled on the previous winter’s lethargy, the farmer has to pull out of some unmentionable orifice the energy and enthusiasm that made spring planting seem so appealing.

Continue Reading: Potato Patch

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 08/22, 2012 at 10:14 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

The Disease That Must Not Be Named

The rain has finally let up, but not before it brought imminent danger to certain crops. The word in the farmosphere is that late blight has been sighted in certain central Pennsylvania counties.

Continue Reading: The Disease That Must Not Be Named

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 06/15, 2012 at 08:00 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

It’s Raining Again

It’s raining again. The intermittent stream that runs by our house is so full I could kayak down to the pond. Nothing like a little white water rafting after a brief interlude of weeding the beets. That’s just the way it is on a farm, you go with the deluge.

Continue Reading: It’s Raining Again

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 06/06, 2012 at 08:00 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

Early Signs of Spring

Signs of spring are appearing a little early this year, as can be seen from the picture above showing new garlic shoots poking through the soil. Garlic is always the first crop to make an appearance and has more credibility in predicting the beginning of spring than pampered rodents. 

Continue Reading: Early Signs of Spring

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 02/23, 2012 at 06:34 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

Late January Greens

Green Heron Farm still has a nice supply of greens this week, but order early for those items – they fly off the shelf this time of year:

Baby Arugula
Baby Spinach
Baby Chard – Green, Red and Gold
Italian and Red Rib Dandelion

Continue Reading: Late January Greens

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 01/23, 2012 at 09:20 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming |

How Floods Affect Farms

Last week’s flooding was an adventure—one that I would prefer not repeating once every 15 years or so. We got off easy by some accounts. Most of our crops are still in the ground, although about a third of our lane was redistributed to the entrance of our house.

Living on a slope has its advantages and as long as the water keeps flowing through the basement, we’re doing OK. Getting off the farm in a flood is the tough part.

Continue Reading: How Floods Affect Farms

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 09/13, 2011 at 11:23 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farm | farming |

Turning Toward Fall

The season is tilting decidedly toward fall, and the crops are shifting toward soup ingredients and fall fruit.

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{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 09/07, 2011 at 01:58 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming | farm |

When Natural Disasters Strike

The week wouldn’t be complete without a natural disaster. Last week we hit the jackpot with two – an earthquake and a hurricane – although it was our eastern neighbors who were most affected.

Continue Reading: When Natural Disasters Strike

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 08/29, 2011 at 11:07 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming | farm |

The Great Divide

Every once in a while I’ll get a question from someone who feels the need to engage me in agricultural discourse in order to spotlight my complete ignorance of farming. And quite honestly, I’m the first to admit that I don’t know everything about farming. That’s why I love this business – there’s something to learn every day. 

Continue Reading: The Great Divide

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 07/19, 2011 at 11:02 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: farming | market |

NPR: How Industrial Farming “Destroyed” the Tasty Tomato

If you bite into a tomato between the months of October and June, chances are that tomato came from Florida. And it tastes dramatically different than the varieties you might grow in your backyard or pick up at your local farmers market during the summer.

Freelance food writer Barry Estabrook looks at the life of today’s mass-produced tomato — and the environmental and human costs of the tomato industry — in his book Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit.

Listen to his interview with Terry Gross for Fresh Air.

Continue Reading: NPR: How Industrial Farming “Destroyed” the Tasty Tomato

{name} Posted by Emily Wiley on 07/13, 2011 at 11:32 AM

Comments (1) | Permalink | Tags: farming | tomatoes |

Garlic Harvest

There are several milestones during the year that mark dramatic shifts in the growing season. For me, it’s always the garlic harvest, which coincides with the first full week of summer. The harvest brings to a close the long wait for the king of alliums that started back in November when the final clove was tucked in the ground for the winter.

Garlic is a precise, no-nonsense crop that sticks to its preordained schedule whether you like it or not. It’s not going to wait around for a distracted farmer to fit it in to his daily planner. Wait a week too long and tough luck, it’s on to its next phase of development without so much as a by-your-leave.

Continue Reading: Garlic Harvest

{name} Posted by Tony Ricci on 06/29, 2011 at 12:07 PM

Comments (1) | Permalink | Tags: garlic | farming |

Three Minute Gardener: How to Renovate a Strawberry Patch

After the June harvest of strawberries, patches should be renovated in preparation for the following year. Penn State Senior Extension Educator Kathy Demchak explains why these renovations are important and how to complete them.

Watch the video.

Continue Reading: Three Minute Gardener: How to Renovate a Strawberry Patch

{name} Posted by Emily Wiley on 06/28, 2011 at 10:05 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: strawberries | farming |

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Food Stories from NPR
These 5 Crops Are Still Hand-Harvested, And It's Hard Work

September 01, 2014

Saffron, vanilla, palm oil, cacao and cottonseed oil are still picked by hand in some parts of the world. Sometimes that manual labor shows up in the price of the food; sometimes it doesn't.

Cutting Back On Carbs, Not Fat, May Lead To More Weight Loss

September 01, 2014

A new diet study concludes that a low-carbohydrate diet leads to almost three times more weight loss than a traditional low-fat diet where carbs made up 40 to 45 percent of calories.

Mugs Aren't Just For Liquids, Make A Microwave Meal In Them

September 01, 2014

David Greene swaps recipes for cooking in a mug with Joe Yonan, author of the "Cooking for One" column for The Washington Post. (This piece initially aired on Feb. 25, 2013 on Morning Edition.)

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