New Year’s traditions in Pennsylvania: why pork and sauerkraut?

Many people are aware of the New Year’s tradition of eating pork and sauerkraut, including the supposed good luck and wealth it brings. This tradition is part of our Pennsylvania German heritage; the idea of sauerkraut symbolizing wealth for the new year comes from Germany. Before having the New Year’s dinner, each diner wishes the other as much wealth as there are shreds of cabbage in a pot of sauerkraut.

What about pork? Interestingly enough, the actions of a pig give us this New Year’s tradition.

Continue Reading: New Year’s traditions in Pennsylvania: why pork and sauerkraut?

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 12/31, 2013 at 12:01 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: recipe | NewYears | PennsylvaniaDutch | sauerkraut | pork |

Recipe: Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas cookies

I grew up in York, part of the original Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Therefore, there are several things that say Christmas to me that most others have no idea about. One is Der Belsnickel, a sort of nasty fellow who’s job it is to make sure children are good in the weeks before Christmas by, well, beating them with a stick. Think of him as Santa’s muscle.

Another, more benevolent aspect of Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas is some of the traditional cookies that families bake for the season.

Continue Reading: Recipe: Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas cookies

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 12/24, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: recipes | PennsylvaniaDutch | Christmascookies | cookies |

Some great sources for last-minute local food gifts

Looking for a perfect last-minute gift for someone on your holiday list, but are stumped as what to get them? Our area’s local food community has a lot of fantastic options. I mean, who doesn’t love a food gift? And thankfully, we have a plenty of local food vendors who provide a lot of wonderful gift options.

Here’s just a few gift ideas, and some places to find them:

Continue Reading: Some great sources for last-minute local food gifts

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 12/19, 2013 at 10:33 AM

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Sweeten up the holidays with desserts from Gemelli Bakers

Gemelli Bakers has made a name for itself by baking wonderful bread. However, they also make some fantastic desserts. Gemelli is not as well known as a source for great baked desserts, but more and more people in the area are becoming aware of the sweet goodness that they offer at their downtown State College location, or at area farmers markets.

“We’ve been making desserts from day one,” said Tony Sapia, owner of Gemelli Bakers. “A few examples of what we bake include Italian cookies like biscotti and macaroon, American-style cookies like oatmeal raisin and chocolate chip, apricot fruit bars, pies…there’s quite a list.”

Continue Reading: Sweeten up the holidays with desserts from Gemelli Bakers

{name} Posted by Jamie Oberdick on 12/18, 2013 at 12:01 PM

Comments (0) | Permalink | Tags: Christmas | holidays | Gemelli | dessert | cake | pie | cookies |

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