NPR: How Industrial Farming “Destroyed” the Tasty Tomato

Posted by Emily Wiley on 07/13, 2011 at 10:32 AM

Heirloom Tomatoes. Photo Credit Emily Wiley.

If you bite into a tomato between the months of October and June, chances are that tomato came from Florida. And it tastes dramatically different than the varieties you might grow in your backyard or pick up at your local farmers market during the summer.

Freelance food writer Barry Estabrook looks at the life of today’s mass-produced tomato — and the environmental and human costs of the tomato industry — in his book Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit.

Listen to his interview with Terry Gross for Fresh Air.

More from NPR.

Tags: farming | tomatoes |

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{name} Author: Emily Wiley

Bio: WPSU Multimedia Producer | Wife and Mother | Lover of Food and Photography | One-Half of The Culinary Couple

Comments

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
08/10 at 11:40 AM
State College, PA

Bob’s Simple Tomato and Butter Sauce

1 lb. fresh plum tomatoes, chopped
3 tbsp butter
One small onion, peeled and cut in half
1/3 cup good dry white wine
Parmigiano-reggiano cheese
Salt and black pepper to taste

Put all ingredients, except the cheese, in a saucepan and simmer over low heat until tomatoes have broken down and the onion is tender – about 20 minutes.
Remove pan from heat and discard the onion.  Toss with your pasta of choice and top with lots of Parmesan cheese.
So simple and so delicious!

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